Rock the Vote

How do you engage the young American voter to vote? Since 1990, Rock the Vote, a  non partisan, non-profit organization, has been engaging the young American voter understand the power of their vote. Through the use of social media, new technologies (mobile technology), music and celebrities in youtube/T.V. campaigns, Rock the Vote has encouraged 5 million young Americans to register to vote.  The question remains why is Rock the Vote so successful in luring the young millennial to vote? What are some of the elements that makes Rock the Vote stand out and inspire the young American voter?

In this video, Rock the Vote gathered several contemporary celebrities to carry out the message of collective voting and  encourage the young millennial that their voice will be heard at the ballots through the use of voting. The “We Will” campaign during the 2012 election season. This video ad below ran for about 8 weeks.

In the next video just published a few days ago, Rock the Vote released a marketing campaign themed, “Turn Down for What?,” to encourage the young millennial to vote in the upcoming 2014 midterm elections. Here, Rock the Vote uses celebrities to remind the young millennial that voting can help them voice their opinion on the  issues they are more concerned about. In the video, one can see that celebrities such as Lena Dunham, Whoopi Goldberg and Lil Jon speaking out the issues they feel are important to address.

References:

Flanagin, J. (2014, October 9). Here’s why you should turn out and rock the vote. New York Times. Retrieved Oct 11, 2014, from http://op-talk.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/09/heres-why-you-should-turn-out-and-rock-the-vote/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

http://www.rockthevote.com

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5 Responses to Rock the Vote

  1. Chanel says:

    Totally down for anything that gets people out to vote (especially young people). Not totally sure how effective the “Turn out for what?” video is compared to the emotional connection to “We will.” “Turn out for what?” seemed to even make jokes about what they are voting to support as if they weren’t taking themselves or the issue seriously which kind of erked me. The celebrity draw probably does make these videos popular but you’re right to ask how successful they are. Social media seemed to have worked with Obama with the highest turnout for young people ever! Is there a gauge to see how these campaign are effective? Is the campaign attempting to make voting cool? Not sure if it’s working on that front. Seems like many young people today still don’t care, maybe showing how national legislation can actually impact young people’s lives. Touching into making young people upset, sad, or angry would be more effective?

  2. Natalie says:

    I found it interesting that they speak to individual issues that young people might care about – legalizing marijuana, student loans, racial equality, gay marriage. I would like to see these videos not only calling out young people to vote, but giving them some resources so that they can educate themselves on ballot measures and candidates. The call to action is great – however how does a young person who sees this video and identifies with supporting an issue equate that to voting for a particular candidate?

  3. Nicholette says:

    Great post. Like the previous comment, I too found it interesting that they highlighted specific issues in the Lil John “Turn Out For What” video that are typically faced by young adults. Obviously this was a blatant attempt at appealing to target audience by focusing on issues that are relatable. Though some of the actors did seem disingenuous (Orange is the New Black actress voting for prison reform, seriously? The distinction between fiction and reality blurred here for me), I actually found the video to be fun, entertaining, and kind of motivating. Maybe I’m a sucker for advertising, but at the end of the day these actors are humans too, and I’d like to think that they care enough about these issues to vote. Then again these people are actors so who knows. Bottom line, until there is a way to quantify the turnout based on a campaign of this type, it’s hard to say how effective it is. Connecting campaigns like these to a new system that allows citizens to vote online would be a great way measure that. Hopefully technology will catch up in our lifetime!

  4. Nicholette says:

    Great post. Like the previous comment, I too found it interesting that they highlighted specific issues in the Lil John “Turn Out For What” video that are typically faced by young adults. Obviously this was a blatant attempt at appealing to target audience by focusing on issues that are relatable. Though some of the actors did seem disingenuous (Orange is the New Black actress voting for prison reform, seriously? The distinction between fiction and reality blurred here for me), I actually found the video to be fun, entertaining, and kind of motivating. Maybe I’m a sucker for advertising, but at the end of the day these actors are humans too, and I’d like to think that they care enough about these issues to vote (or else why attach your name to this commercial?). Then again these people are actors so who knows. Bottom line, until there is a way to quantify the turnout based on a campaign of this type, it’s hard to say how effective it is. Connecting campaigns like these to a new system that allows citizens to vote online would be a great way measure that. Hopefully technology will catch up in our lifetime!

  5. Dominic says:

    Rock the Vote relates to people, mainly young people. But here is an interesting questions, how can we motivate older generations to vote. When Rock the Vote started, young people did not vote as much as they do today. I’m sure the statistics would support my claim. But I see a new problem, that is, why older people are not voting. How can we motivated older generations? The answer may lie in social media, people watch, MTV and as a result, it influenced young people to vote. Let’s use social media in the same way, it is hard to argue with social media’s popularity. Time to use it to target new groups to vote!