Snow White Gone Wrong

Overly sensitive or inadequately created? Recently, Snow White has gotten in a bit of trouble. In a recent marketing campaign for the animated film “Red Shoes and the 7 Dwarfs,” many critics have expressed their sheer disgust for the portrayal of the two Snow White characters. So much so, that the characters voiceover artist, Chloe Grace, expressed her position, “I have now fully reviewed the [marketing] for Red Shoes, I am just as appalled and angry as everyone else, this wasn’t approved by me or my team.”

Based on the creators of the film, the story is about “a Princess who doesn’t fit into the celebrity world of Princesses — or their dress size.” Although the film promises that the main purpose is empowering women, however, some have disagreed and have labeled the marketing as body shaming.

In your opinion, do you think the marketing communications went too far?

References

Rottenberg, J. (2017, May). Chloe Grace Moretz addresses body-shaming controversy over Snow White movie. Retrieved from URL. http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-entertainment-news-updates-may-chlo-grace-moretz-addresses-1496270279-htmlstory.html

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5 Responses to Snow White Gone Wrong

  1. Tracy Gohari says:

    It’s hard to imagine the actual script is “beautiful” and inspiring based on the trailer. It’s astounding to me this is the trailer chosen by the marketing team. While I can appreciate how it feels when you take off your Spanx :), this really goes too far. Ugh!!

  2. Mariam says:

    Hi Araz, nice post!

    You pose a very delicate question. Body weight has always been associated with negative connotation in almost every marketing campaign, even though their purpose was to encourage or, as you state, “empower” women. I think the marketers crossed the line with this campaign, as the message they want to send conveys absolutely the opposite,” You have to be lean and slim in order to fit into the celebrity world of princesses.”

    Best,

    Mariam

  3. Dena Lawless says:

    I’m a little torn about this subject. First of all, it’s not an appropriate movie for young girls due to the creepy dwarves watching Snow White undress. It seems more like a Simpson audience parody. Second it clearly shows how bad marketing can take down an expensive, long-planned movie (or event, or product). Third, when did we get so PC about being overweight? It’s a huge epidemic in the US with severe consequences to young people (and people of all ages) including early diabetes and heart disease. It causes major medical conditions and expensive health care. The nation can’t have it both ways. We need to send messages of getting healthy, not eating fast food junk or excess sugar (and sugar substitutes). Yes, the ad and film went too far, but we can’t celebrate unhealthy lifestyles either.

  4. Steve says:

    I would prefer to not judge the film, but I can see where people can get offended by the marketing of it. However, we’re in a society where people are sometimes excessively sensitive, and well, that can cause issues. The premise of the film sounds promising, so despite the ad, I would see it just to see what its all about.

  5. Violet ward says:

    I think that this movie could be appropriate if the final message portrayed an appreciation for all body types. I would like to see Snow White have a positive body image regardless of her weight.