Blogging: easy money and glamour…or waste of time?

Blogging has undoubtedly taken off over the last few years. It seems like everyone is blogging these days: moms, teenagers, self-proclaimed chefs, fashion lovers and techies to name a few. Successful bloggers in the fashion industry are invited to exclusive fashion shows in Paris, have front row seats at New York Fashion Week and mingle with elite fashion designers and supermodels. Even 15-year old, Tavi Gevinson, who started blogging at age 11, has been able to make a name for herself in the industry and was recently sitting front row next to Vogue’s Editor-in-Chief, Anna Wintour in New York.

It seems pretty simple, right? Pick something you love to talk about, create a website and just talk about it. Wrong. According to Forbes, there are more than 20 million bloggers and only a mere 2% make a successful living. If there are so many bloggers out there and so few that can make a living doing it, is it worth the time and dedication needed to establish your blog and to gain the attention of advertisers? What makes some bloggers stand apart from all the others? Social Media Today credits SEO, keywords, buzz and  constant maintenance amongst other things to creating a successful blog. Although it seems simple for anyone to launch his or her own blog, the blogger needs to have basic marketing, especially online and Internet marketing, knowledge in order to compete in the cut throat blogger industry.

Social media outlets like Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest are jackpots for blogs. If a person reads a blog and shares the link with his or her friends or followers on a social media outlet, the blog is broadcast, for free, to that person’s network. An added bonus is that Millennials, 18-34 year olds and those who spend much of their time online, trust word of mouth over any other kind of advertising. In other words, they will be more likely to follow a blog if a friend or family member recommends it rather than if they discovered the blog through a paid advertisement.

To blog or not to blog? If you’re thinking of starting a blog, by all means, go for it! You’ll be sharing your thoughts, ideas and comments about something you enjoy talking about and you may even earn some money while doing it. But, before your blogging career truly takes off, don’t quit your day job. Blogging on the side is the perfect way to dabble in the field without fully jumping onboard not knowing where your career will end up.

http://www.forbes.com/2010/04/14/blogging-career-income-personal-finance-blog-income.html

http://www.thestylerookie.com/

http://socialmediatoday.com/index.php?q=zubinkutar/212318/what-makes-blog-successful

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3 Responses to Blogging: easy money and glamour…or waste of time?

  1. Jesus Torres says:

    Sogol,

    Interesting post. I agree with your assessment about blogging. I started my own blog in 2004, called it Poli-Tech and I posted about politics, technology and other current events, but I slowly lost interest in it. I haven’t blogged in years. Blogging is a full time job and the casual blogger will not make an impact unless they offer something very unique and insightful or very trashy and funny. They key is to offer something of value. Blogging seemed to have died down in the middle of last decade, but with the advent of micro-blogging sites like Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, the tools to drive traffic to your blog exist now. When I was writing my blog, I could only hope that somehow it would be discovered on the internet. Nowadays, you can integrate your presence in the internet with Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook and drive your own traffic. That’s how most people do it. They Tweet about the topic of their blog with a link. That link directs people to the said blog and there people can click on their Facebook Page if that’s the medium they most prefer to get their information. If someone gets their info from LinkedIn, then the blogger can send them there too.

    Now I am contemplating starting a blog on the communications topics we study for this program. Since we’re creating content all the time through discussion posts and assignments, this could serve as good blogging material. Since I’ll sound smart on the blog (I hope), the public will see me as an authority in these topics and begin to follow/Like/friend me. Ha! If it was only that easy.

    Thanks again for your thoughts.

    Jesus

  2. Hi Sogol,

    I think that of the three choices, easy money or glamour or a waste of time, I’m gonna go with glamour, if only to have a little light shine on you for that moment you click “publish.”

    I agree that if someone is thinking of becoming the next fashion maven, self made media like Perez Hilton was years ago, or a mogul like Ariana Huffington, who smartly merchandised a blog into a media empire by connecting like-minded writers who loved what they were doing, then they better do their homework, extra studying and get lots of sleep to prep for their foray into the blogosphere.

    At the very least, blogging challenges your writing skills. Not formal writing per se, but persuasive, entertaining prose. Its the kind of copy that may or may not ever see the light of another monitor, but it also sharpens the economics of writing, finding impactful statements of wonderful brevity for just the right moment.

    As a communicator, I also wanted the experience of developing a blog site for myself from scratch and learn enough to educate my clients on how to best use their blog sites. I also use my blog, bewelltoday.org, as a media outlet for featuring client announcements and milestones of import. It never hurts to be a publisher!

    Thanks.

    Al

    But doing all that, even loving what you are doing, doesn’t guarantee success.

    I am reminded of the Declaration of Independence’s famous line,
    “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” is exactly as it is written. Pur

  3. Hi Sogol,

    One thing about being your own publisher — you can re-edit your mistakes!

    I wasn’t able to delete the Declaration of Independence reference in my previous comment, so I’ll clarify my point.

    We have the right to pursue what makes us happy, and everything else is promised to no one (at least no one I know!)….

    thx.